Home / fatigue

fatigue

Diseases that can cause this symptom:

Anaemia

Anaemia is the deficiency of red blood pigment and / or red blood cells and thus a too low proportion of blood cells in the body to carry adequate oxygen to your body’s tissues. Having anaemia can make you feel tired and weak. Women are more susceptible because of their menstrual periods. An imbalanced diet or certain genetic chronic diseases can also lead to anaemia. Signs of anaemia are paleness, dizziness, headaches, tiredness and lack of concentration, along with shortness of breath and chest pains and increased susceptibility to infections.

Arthritis

Arthritis is an inflammatory joint disease that can lead to damage to the joint surfaces. Besides bacteria, other infections in the body, a hereditary predisposition, as well as autoimmune processes can play a central role in the development of the disease. The inflammatory processes cause not only pain but also swelling of the joint, overheating and reddening of the skin in the area and joint effusion. In the beginning, symptoms show maybe morning stiffness, fatigue, exhaustion, fever, loss of appetite. In acute arthritis, the joint inflammation occurs very suddenly, while chronic arthritis is a protracted joint disease. Over time, there may be progressive destruction of the joint, which limits mobility and can lead to and joint deformation.

Colds and Influenza

The real flu (influenza) is a severe acute illness of the respiratory tract, caused by influenza viruses, which are constantly changing. Less dangerous are colds or “flu-like infections” caused by other pathogens. While influenza begins with a sudden feeling of illness – with fever (high, often above 40°C), sore throat and dry cough, accompanied by severe muscle, limb, back or headaches – a cold develops slowly and is less severe. Typically, exhaustion and fatigue are much more pronounced in influenza.

Covid-19 related symptoms: Prevention, Infection, Recovery

The lung disease, which appeared for the first time in China at the end of 2019, is commonly known as Corona Virus Disease 2019 (COVID-19). The virus that caused the disease, is known as Sars-CoV-2. SARS stands for “Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome”.

Coronaviruses were first identified in the mid-1960s and can infect humans or animals. Some variations of the coronavirus that previously infected animals exclusively can cross over to humans, spread and lead to severe illnesses.

The incubation period (the time between infection and outbreak of the disease) is currently estimated at 5 to 6 days on average. People who have been infected with the new coronavirus are contagious during the incubation period before the first symptoms appear.

There are no “typical” symptoms that clearly identify COVID-19. The symptoms and their severity vary from person to person. Since COVID-19 primarily affects the respiratory tract, the most common symptoms are similar to other respiratory diseases such as the flu or common cold: cough, fever, runny or stuffy nose, smell and taste disturbances, discomfort and fatigue.

Other COVID-19 symptoms may include sore throat, shortness of breath, headache and aching limbs, loss of appetite, weight loss, nausea, abdominal pain, vomiting and diarrhoea. These initial signs of illness should not be underestimated, because in particularly severe cases, those affected will develop lung inflammation, excessive immune reactions or persistent breathing difficulties and have to receive intensive medical treatment in hospital.

Unfortunately, there is hardly any treatment or medication in western medicine that specifically targets the...

Diabetes (non-insulin-dependent diabetes)

Diabetes mellitus is a group of metabolic diseases which are characterized by a chronically elevated blood sugar level. Most common are Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes.

Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease, which usually begins in childhood or adolescence, where the immune system attacks the body. As a result, the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas die and lead to an absolute deficiency of the body’s hormone insulin. Without insulin, blood sugar levels rise, and patients become insulin-dependent and have to inject it.

About 90% of diabetics have type 2 diabetes, they are non-insulin-dependent, but in later stages can become insulin-dependent. Overweight, unhealthy nutrition and too little exercise increases the risk of disease and can lead to diabetes in genetically predisposed individuals. Type 2 diabetics have an elevated sugar level in the blood due to insulin resistance, meaning the body’s cells react less well to insulin. Insulin is responsible for transferring sugar molecules from the blood into the cells. If the insulin resistance is too high – the sugar accumulates in the blood vessels. Elevated blood sugar levels are mainly indicated by fatigue, lack of drive, increased thirst and urination, a tendency to catch infections and poorly healing wounds, as well as dry or itching skin. Acute complications are infections, severe high sugar level up to sugar coma. Complications arising in the large and small blood vessels and nervous system can lead to heart, eye and kidney disease, as well as diabetic...

Fibromyalgia

Coming soon….

High Cholesterol

Cholesterol is a fatty substance that is found in the blood and naturally produced in the liver. Only a small part of the cholesterol is absorbed with food. Too much Cholesterol is deposited in the blood vessels and stored in the walls of the arteries, leading to a thickening of the vessel wall so that the elasticity of the vessels is reduced, and also narrowing of the vessels (arteriosclerosis). This causes reduced blood flow in the affected vessels and leads to circulatory disorders that exhibit symptoms such as chest pain or discomfort, heart attack, stroke, pain while walking caused by the blocked vessels, tiredness.

HIV / AIDS

HIV stands for “Human Immunodeficiency Virus”, the pathogen that weakens the human immune system. Infection with HIV most often occur during unprotected sexual intercourse or through HIV-infected blood. Failure to treat HIV infection means that at a certain point in time the body will no longer be able defend itself against other infectious pathogens and falls seriously ill with normally harmless diseases. This condition is then called “Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome” (AIDS). People with AIDS often suffer from pneumonia and fungal diseases.

Hypotension

Low blood pressure (hypotension) does not lead to serious vascular and organ damage such as a stroke or heart attack, in contrast to high blood pressure, it actually spares the vessels, the heart and the entire circulation.

The blood pressure should ideally be below 120/ 80 mmHg. If the systolic value (the top value) is below 110 (men) or 100 (women) and the diastolic value (bottom value) below 60, the World Health Organization (WHO) speaks of hypotension. Depending on the person, either feeling nothing, uncomfortable or quite ill, hypotension can lead to the following symptoms: dizziness, stargazing or fatigue, depression.

Hypothyroidism

If the thyroid gland produces too few hormones, this is called hypothyroidism. Thyroid hormones are energy suppliers for many body cells, therefore a lack of these hormones slows down the metabolic processes in the body. Possible causes of hypothyroidism are Hashimoto thyroiditis (an autoimmune disease of the thyroid gland), removal of the thyroid gland or radiotherapy, iodine deficiency (needed for the formation of thyroid hormones), medication or drugs. The symptoms are typically rather unspecific and can be more or less pronounced: lack of drive, sleep disturbances, hair loss, constipation, weight gain, tiredness, general physical exhaustion, muscle weakness, depressive mood.

Indigestion

Indigestion is a collective term for complaints of the digestive organs. In most cases, the causes are harmless, such as eating too fast or eating spicy, greasy and fatty foods. Sometimes the reason for indigestion is to be found in rather serious illnesses like inflammation of the stomach, ulcers, pancreas inflammation, intestinal blockage or reduced blood flow in the intestine. Symptoms of indigestion may be felt occasionally or as often as daily. Common symptoms are stomach aches, diarrhoea, constipation, flatulence, heartburn, acid reflux and fatigue.

Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS)

Many young women in particular, have sometimes severe symptoms before or at the beginning of their menstruation, which is called “premenstrual syndrome” (PMS). Strong hormonal changes and other physical processes around the menstrual period are the cause, but in most women, these decrease over the years. Possible physical symptoms include for example headaches and chest tightness, abdominal pain, circulation problems, weight gain, oedema and indigestion. Psychological symptoms include lack of concentration, exhaustion, listlessness, hypersensitivity, irritability and mood swings.

Sinusitis

Sinusitis is the swelling of the mucous membrane in the paranasal sinuses. Respiratory viruses causing the common cold or flu, can lead to acute sinusitis. If the condition lasts longer than three months, it is considered as chronic sinusitis. When one has a cold, the nose is no longer sufficiently ventilated and the secretion that does not run off anymore can cause the swelling of the mucous membrane of the nose and the paranasal sinuses. Typical symptoms are a blocked nose and cough, fever, swelling and pus collection. Pain often occurs in the forehead, jaw or around the eyes and typically the head hurts badly when bending over too quickly.

Urinary Tract Infection (UTI)

Urinary tract infections (UTI’s) are caused usually by bacteria (E.coli), that enter the urethra and bladder, causing inflammation and infection. They are commonly happen in the urethra and bladder, bacteria can also travel up the ureters and infect your kidneys.

A urinary tract infection causes the lining of the urinary tract to become red and irritated (inflammation). The most common symptoms of a UTI are: pain and discomfort, typically in the lower back, abdomen and pelvic pain, pain when urinating, fever, feeling an urge to urinate frequently, abnormal urine color (cloudy urine) and strong or foul-smelling urine.

Most UTIs go away after treatment with antibiotics. However, some people develop chronic UTIs, which don’t go away after treatment or keep recurring.

Recommended products for treatment:

Showing all 4 results